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Domesday Book

 

Domesday Book, our earliest public record, is a rare and remarkable survey which details landholding and resources in late eleventh-century England. No other Western European state produced anything even broadly comparable in its scope until several centuries later. In its sophistication and in the comprehensiveness of its information*, Domesday Book remained unequalled until the nineteenth century. Moreover, the wealth of information that it contains illuminates one of the most crucial times in our history: the conquest and settlement of England by William I and his Norman and northern French followers.

Nevertheless, it could not have been made without the comparatively advanced administrative system that William inherited from his Anglo-Saxon predecessors. By the year 1000 AD most of England was already divided into the network of shires that was to persist with relatively little alteration until the reorganization of the county boundaries in 1974.

During the last years of his reign William’s power was threatened from a number of quarters. Hie North was chronically rebellious, and in 1085, King Canute of Denmark and King Olaf of Norway gathered a great fleet of ships and made preparations for an invasion.

The invasion did not materialize, but such a large and costly exercise may have indicated to the Conqueror the need to reassess Danegeld in order to maximize the revenue, and the value of knowing, in as much detail as possible, precisely what his subjects possessed in England. A reassessment of geld was therefore set in motion and took place at about the same time as the Domesday survey (it only survives for the south-western counties), but this was not, as many Victorian historians believed, the principal object of the exercise. Domesday is far more than just a fiscal record. It is a detailed statement of lands held by the king and by his tenants and of the resources which went with those lands.

* Contary to general belief the Domesday survey did not cover everything in the kingdom. Quite often, for various reasons, churches were not always included e.g. in Kent there were over 400 churches but less than half were recorded in the Domesday Book.

Domesday Books

How Domesday Book was made.

One of the most important near-contemporary accounts of the making of the Domesday survey is that of the Anglo-Saxon chronicler. He tells us that at his 1085 Christmas court at Gloucester William had much thought and very deep discussion about this country—how it was occupied or with what sorts of people.

Then he sent his men all over England into every shire and had them find out how many hundred hides there were in the shire, or what land and cattle the king himself had in the country, or what dues he ought to have in twelve months from the shire. Also he had a record made of how much land his archbishops had, and his bishops and his abbots and his earls, and... what or how much everybody had who was occupying land in England, in land or cattle, and how much money it was worth. So very narrowly did he have it investigated, that there was no single hide nor a yard of land, nor indeed (it is a shame to relate but it seemed no shame to him to do) one ox nor one cow nor one pig which was there left out, and not put down in his record: and all these records were brought to him afterwards.

This passage hints at the dismay and apprehension later expressed in the naming of the survey as Domesday, because of the association with the Day of Judgement, that terrible verdict against which there was no appeal.

Another important description of the survey was written within a few years of its completion by Robert, Bishop of Hereford, one of the ecclesiastics whom William had brought to England. The king’s men, he wrote,

made a survey of all England; of the lands in each of the counties; of the possessions of each of the magnates, their lands, their habitations, their men both bond and free, living in huts or with their own houses and lands; of ploughs, horses and other animals; of the services and payments due from each and every estate. After these investigators came others who were sent to unfamiliar counties to check the first description and to denounce any wrongdoers to the king. And the land was troubled with many calamities arising from the gathering of the royal taxes.

Here we are given invaluable clues about when and how the inquiries were undertaken and, in recent years, most historians have come to agree on the general outlines of this vast operation. There were already earlier lists of lands and taxes in existence, some dating from the Anglo-Saxon period, others from after 1066, which were kept both in the principal royal city of Winchester and locally in the shires. They too were drawn upon for the survey. All of England, apart from the northern counties, which were not yet firmly under Norman control, was divided into seven circuits. The final circuit to be completed was that the Eastern, which consisted of Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk, some of the most populous counties of England. This final circuit was never included in the Great Domesday Book but as a supplement known as Little Domesday Book.

Kent

The Domesday account of Kent contains peculiarities. Only in Kent is the sulung which is divided into four yokes the unit of land assessment.

  • Sulungs = the sulung was both a unit of assessment and a peasant landholding unit, found only in Kent. Like the corresponding units in other counties, the sulung was derived from the vocabulary of ploughing, sulh being the Old English word ...for a plough. The sulung appears normally to have been twice the area of the customary hide or carucate, approximately 240 acres.

  • The yoke was both a unit of assessment and a peasant landholding unit, found only in Kent. Like the corresponding units in other counties, the yoke was derived from the vocabulary of ploughing, the yoke being the term of each of the four paired-oxen which composed the standard plough team. The yoke was therefore a quarter of the Kentish plough, the sulh, approximately 60 acres.

It is usually assumed that the sulung was larger than the more common hide, but it probably also represented the amount of land on which one family could live for one year. Administratively the shire was divided into hundreds as were most English shires. But in Kent the hundreds were grouped into seven lathes. East Kent had the lathes of Wye, Borough, Lympne and Eastry. West Kent had Aylesford and the half-lathes of Milton and Sutton. The lathes continued to be the basis of Kentish local government until the 1974 Local Government Reorganization.

Cliffe

All the original entries in the Domesday Book were written in 11th century clerical Latin, so stylised and abbreviated that it is beyond the scope of a graduate in Latin, without special training.

During the Victorian period many different translations were made which varied greatly in reliability which led to great confusion to students of history.

It was not until 1968, under the leadership of Dr. John Morris, that an accepted translation was agreed. The first county volumes appeared in print in 1975.

The Cliffe entries are shown below, both as the whole page and individual entries.

RELATED OR 'SATELLITE' TEXTS

Philip Morgan

In common with other counties a number of Domesday-like texts survive for Kent which appear to bear some relation to Domesday itself. The most notable are the Domesday Monachorum of Christ Church, Canterbury, a Domesday-like account of some ecclesiastical estates, with a different order and different information to Domesday; and an eleventh-century Inquisition of St Augustine's, Canterbury, commonly referred to as the Excerpta, which likewise contains information presented in the fashion of Domesday and refers to the Survey in its own heading. Both texts omit much of the manorial detail to be found in Domesday .

The Domesday Monachorum is in reality a group of four texts, only one of which is claimed as a Domesday satellite. The manuscript survives in a hand of c.1100 but is itself a copy of an earlier document, which its editor, David Douglas, argues was compiled in 1087 from the original returns of the Domesday Survey. It has more recently been argued (by Hoyt, 'Pre-Domesday Kentish Assessment List'), that part at least of another text is an assessment list independent of and earlier than the Domesday Survey itself.

The Excerpta survives only in an emended thirteenth-century copy but is derived from an independent compilation made in or before 1087. This compilation is likewise argued to have been based on the information of the original returns. The thirteenth-century heading of the document refers both to the 'King's Domesday' and to an 'account of the sulungs of the County of Kent', perhaps an assessment list of the kind which appears as part of the Domesday Monachorum.

In recent years the significance of these texts and of the Kent folios in general has assumed a great importance in the debate dealing with the making of Domesday Book. In outline the debate revolves around the question as to whether such texts as the Excerpta and Domesday Monachorum are to be seen as products of the Domesday Survey itself, which is the conclusion of the editors of both texts, or else as part of the framework of Anglo-Norman governance to which the Domesday Survey was the immediate heir. An account of the major theories is to be found inGalbraith, Making of Domesday Book, pp. 146-155; Galbraith, Domesday Book: Its Place in Administrative History; Harvey, 'Domesday Book and its Predecessors'; Harvey, 'Domesday Book and Anglo-Norman Governance'.

Creative Commons Licence: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England and Wales. Philip Morgan
See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Domedsay Book for Cliffe, Kent

Page from The Great Domesday Book showing the entry for Kent and lands held by Arnulf de Hesdin.
Note: Click on thumbnail to open at full size
Creative commons BY-SA licence credit Prof. JJN Palmer & George Slater

Domesday for Cliffe Kent

Page from The Great Domesday Book showing the entry for Kent and lands held by the Archbishop
Note: Note: Click on thumbnail to open at full size
Creative commons BY-SA licence credit Prof. JJN Palmer & George Slater

 

Below are the two entries for Cliffe taken from the Kent pages shown above and, futher down, are the English translations together with a table showing clearly how important Cliffe was in early Norman times.



 

IN 'SHAMWELL' HUNDRED

Ralph fitz Turold holds OAKLEIGH of the bishop. It is assessed at 1 sulung. There is land for half a plough, and there are besides 30 acres of land. In demesne is 1 plough; and 6 villans have half a plough. There are 12 acres of meadow. TRE, and afterwards, it was worth 40s ; now 4l. Hunæf held it of Earl Harold.

Ansgot of Rochester holds HENHURST. It is assessed at half a sulung. There is land for 1 plough. In
demesne is 1 plough, and 2 villans with 4 slaves. TRE it was worth 20s ; when received, 30s ; now 40s. Godwine held it of Earl Godwine.

Ernulf de Hesdin holds CLIFFE of the bishop. It is assessed at half a sulung. There is land [...]. In
demesne [is] half a plough, and 2 villans, and 10 acres of meadow and pasture for 100 sheep. TRE, and afterwards, it was worth 30s. 2 brothers, Ælfric and Ordric, held it of King Edward.

The archbishop himself holds CLIFFE. It is assessed at 3 ½ sulungs. There is land for 6 ploughs. In demesne are 1 ½ ploughs; and 20 villans with 18 bordars have 5 ½ ploughs. There is a church, and 2 slaves, and 36 acres of meadow, [and] woodland rendering 12d. TRE the whole manor was worth 6l ; and afterwards 7l ; and now 16l.

The same Ernulf holds 'HAVEN' [in Frindsbury] of the bishop. It is assessed at 3 yokes. There is land for 1 plough, and there is [1 plough] in demesne; and 6 villans with 1 bordar have 1 plough. There are 6 acres of meadow. TRE, and afterwards, it was worth 50s ; now 60s. Osweard held it of King Edward.

Odo holds 1 yoke of the bishop in the same 'Haven' [in Frindsbury]. There is land for half a plough. In
demesne is nothing. TRE and afterwards, as now, worth 20s.

The same Odo holds COOLING of the bishop. It is assessed at half a sulung. There is land for half a
plough. There is [half a plough], with 1 bordar, and 4 acres of meadow. TRE, and afterwards, it was worth 20s ; now 30s. God held it of King Edward.

Helto holds [?] 'MERSTON' [in Shorne] of the bishop. It is assessed at half a sulung. There is land for 1
plough, and there is [1 plough], with 5 villans, and 1 acre of meadow. TRE, and afterwards, it was worth 10s ; now 30s. Wulfweard White held it of King Edward.

 

Name Held by Sulungs Ploughs Meadows Villages Smallholders Vaulue pre 1066 Value Now Held for Owned by Now Owned
Chalk Adam, son of Hubert 3 9 16 14 6 £7 £10 Randulf Peverel  

Bishop of Bayeux

Higham Adam, son of Hubert 5 15 30 24 12 £15 £15  

Godwin, son of Karli & Toli

Bishop of Bayeux
Cooling Adam, son of Hubert 1.5 4 7 5       Wulfwin

Earl Leofwin

Bishop of Bayeux
Beckley Adam, son of Hubert 0.5 1.5   1 2 £0.50 £0.75 Wulfwin Earl Leofwin Bishop of Bayeux
Oakleigh Adam, son of Hubert 1 2 12 6 £2 £4

Hunæf of Oakleigh

Earl Harold Bishop of Bayeux
Henhurst

Ansgot of Rochester

0.5 2   2 18 £1 £2 Godwin Earl Godwine Bishop of Bayeux
Cliffe Archbishop 3.5 7.5 36 20   £6 £16     Land of the Archbishop's Monks
Cliffe

Arnulf of Hesdin

0.5 0.5 10 2 18 £1.50 £1.50 Aelfric & Ordric King Edward Bishop of Bayeux
Cliffe Total 4 8 46 22 18 £7.50 £17.50    
Haven

Arnulf of Hesdin

  1 6 6 1 £2.50 £3 Osward King Edward Bishop of Bayeux
Haven Odo   0.5       £1 £1     Bishop of Bayeux
Cooling Odo 0.5 0.5 4   1 £1.50 £1.50   King Edward Bishop of Bayeux
Merston Helto 0.5 1 1 5   £0.50 £1.50 Wulward White King Edward Bishop of Bayeux

 

As can be seen, Cliffe was still of great importance towards the end of the 11th century.

Who were these people named in the Domesday Book?

King Edward 1003-1066. Also known, some two hundred years later, as Edward the Confessor due to his deep piety. He was also the son-in-law to Earl Godwin of Wessex and brother-in-law to Harold; the last Saxon king of England.

Earl Leofwine was the younger brother of King Harold II and the fifth son of Earl Godwin. He was Earl of Kent, Essex, Middlesex, Hertford, Surrey and probably Buckinghamshire. He died on the 14th October, 1066 during the battle of Santlache Ridge together with his brothers Harold and Gyrth.

Lanfranc. The Archbishop, who held the land at Cliffe was Lanfranc. Lanfranc, the son of a lawyer, was born in Pavia in about 1010.

In 1042 he became a monk at the Abbey of Bec. An outstanding biblical scholar, Lanfranc became Prior of the Abbey of Bec in 1045. He opened a school in the monastery and was soon attracting scholars from France, Gascony, Brittany, Flanders, Germany and Italy. This included Anselm, the future Archbishop of Canterbury.

Lanfranc established a reputation as one of the world's most important biblical scholars. In 1053 he came into conflict with William the Conqueror over his disapproval of the duke's marriage to Matilda of Flanders. William ordered Lanfranc to leave Normandy but the two men were later reconciled.

In 1063 William the Conqueror appointed Lanfranc as Abbott of St. Stephen's in Caen. Three years later he played an important role in persuading Pope Alexander II to support the Norman invasion of England.

On the death of Maurilius in 1067 Lanfranc was asked to become Archbishop of Rouen. He refused and instead became William's representative in Rome. In 1070 Lanfranc replaced Stigand as Archbishop of Canterbury. Over the next few years he rebuilt Canterbury Cathedral on the model of St. Stephen's in Caen.

Lanfranc ordered that in future no married man was to be ordained as a priest. However, he allowed existing priests to keep their wives.

Lanfranc came into conflict with the Odo of Bayeux concerning the ownership of land in Kent. Geoffrey of Coutances ruled in Lanfranc's favour and the lands were returned to the Church.

Lanfranc crowned William Rufus king on 26th September, 1087. The following year he supported the new king against the attempts by some Normans, including , Robert of Mortain, Richard Fitz Gilbert, William Fitz Osbern and Geoffrey of Coutances, to place Robert Curthose on the throne.

Lanfranc died in Canterbury on 24th May, 1089.

Aelfric & Ordric brothers

As for the others: those holding lands after the conquest, it would probably take far too long but a brief listing of their holdings is shown below.

Ralph fitz Turold

Lord in 1086:

Hartley, Axton, Kent
Barstable [Hall], Barstable, Essex
Chadwell, Barstable, Essex
Hassenbrook [Hall], Barstable, Essex
Ingrave, Barstable, Essex
Vange, Barstable, Essex
Wickford, Barstable, Essex
Stifford, Chafford, Essex
[East, South and West] Hanningfield, Chelmsford, Essex
Lawn [Hall], Chelmsford, Essex
Moulsham [Hall], Chelmsford, Essex
other Moulsham [Hall], Chelmsford, Essex
Patching [Hall], Chelmsford, Essex
Walter [Hall], Chelmsford, Essex
Boughton [Malherbe], Eyhorne, Kent
Wricklesmarsh, Greenwich, Kent
Addington, Larkfield, Kent
Eccles, Larkfield, Kent
Oakleigh, Shamwell, Kent
Lawford, Tendring, Essex
Thorrington, Tendring, Essex
Luddesdown, Tollingtrough, Kent
Milton, Tollingtrough, Kent
Wateringbury, Twyford, Kent
Sampson's [Farm], Winstree, Essex
Wrotham [Heath], Wrotham, Kent

Arnulf/Ernulf de Hesdin

Ancestor to Scottish Royalty
Lord in 1086:

Cholderton, Amesbury, Wiltshire
Farningham, Axton, Kent
Weston, Bath, Somerset
Mapperton, Beaminster, Dorset
Poorton, Beaminster, Dorset
[Great and Little] Chalfield, Bradford, Wiltshire
[Great and Little] Chalfield, Bradford, Wiltshire
Hatherop, Brightwells Barrow, Gloucestershire
Kempsford, Brightwells Barrow, Gloucestershire
Easton [Piercy] and [Lower] Easton [Piercy], Chippenham, Wiltshire
Chedglow, Cicementone, Wiltshire
Greenford, Elthorne, Middlesex
Ruislip, Elthorne, Middlesex
Ampney [St Nicholas], Gersdones, Gloucestershire
Acton [Turville], Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Badminton, Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Oldbury [-on-the-Hill], Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Oxford, Headington, Berkshire / Buckinghamshire / Oxfordshire
Chelsfield, Helmestrei, Kent
Combe, Hurstbourne, Hampshire
Buttermere, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Pewsey, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Pewsey, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Chalgrave, Manshead, Bedfordshire
Toddington, Manshead, Bedfordshire
Potterne, Rowborough, Wiltshire
Barton [Hartshorn], Rowley, Buckinghamshire
Lenborough, Rowley, Buckinghamshire
Cliffe, Shamwell, Kent
Haven, Shamwell, Kent
[Chipping] Norton, Shipton, Oxfordshire
Newbury, Thatcham, Berkshire
[Higher and Lower] Kingcombe, Tollerford, Dorset
Caverswall, Totmonslow, Staffordshire
Weston [Coyney], Totmonslow, Staffordshire
Upton [Scudamore], Warminster, Wiltshire
Upton [Scudamore], Warminster, Wiltshire
Keevil, Whorwellsdown, Wiltshire

Tenant-in-chief in 1086:

Cholderton, Amesbury, Wiltshire
Cholderton, Amesbury, Wiltshire
Cholderton, Amesbury, Wiltshire
[Black] Bourton, Bampton, Oxfordshire
Weston, Bath, Somerset
Mapperton, Beaminster, Dorset
Poorton, Beaminster, Dorset
[Great and Little] Chalfield, Bradford, Wiltshire
[Great and Little] Chalfield, Bradford, Wiltshire
Hatherop, Brightwells Barrow, Gloucestershire
Kempsford, Brightwells Barrow, Gloucestershire
Calstone [Wellington], Calne, Wiltshire
Easton [Piercy] and [Lower] Easton [Piercy], Chippenham, Wiltshire
Hardenhuish, Chippenham, Wiltshire
Yatton [Keynell], Chippenham, Wiltshire
Chedglow, Cicementone, Wiltshire
Chedglow, Cicementone, Wiltshire
Ruislip, Elthorne, Middlesex
Rodden, Frome, Somerset
Ampney [St Nicholas], Gersdones, Gloucestershire
[Little] Kington and Kington [Magna], Gillingham, Dorset
Kingsbury, Gore, Middlesex
Acton [Turville], Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Badminton, Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Oldbury [-on-the-Hill], Grimboldestou, Gloucestershire
Deverill, Heytesbury, Wiltshire
Combe, Hurstbourne, Hampshire
Clyffe [Pypard], Kingsbridge, Wiltshire
Hilmarton, Kingsbridge, Wiltshire
Witcomb, Kingsbridge, Wiltshire
Buttermere, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Pewsey, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Standen, Kinwardstone, Wiltshire
Chalgrave, Manshead, Bedfordshire
Toddington, Manshead, Bedfordshire
Tickenham, Portbury, Somerset
[Great and Little] Cheverell, Rowborough, Wiltshire
Potterne, Rowborough, Wiltshire
Potterne, Rowborough, Wiltshire
[Chipping] Norton, Shipton, Oxfordshire
Etchilhampton, Studfold, Wiltshire
Hanham, Swineshead, Gloucestershire
Newbury, Thatcham, Berkshire
[Higher and Lower] Kingcombe, Tollerford, Dorset
Offord [Cluny], Toseland, Huntingdonshire
Upton [Scudamore], Warminster, Wiltshire
Upton [Scudamore], Warminster, Wiltshire
Keevil, Whorwellsdown, Wiltshire
Ludwell, Wootton, Oxfordshire
Melbury [Bubb and Osmund], Yetminster, Dorset
Bechenehilde, None, Wiltshire
Bichenehilde, None, Wiltshire
Chenebuild, None, Wiltshire
Winterbourne, None, Wiltshire

Adam, son of Hubert

Ridley Axton Kent
Broadwater Hertfordshire
Graveley Broadwater Hertfordshire
[Great and Little] Wymondley Broadwater Hertfordshire
Canterbury Canterbury Kent
Canterbury Canterbury Kent
Theobald Street Danish Hertfordshire
Barley Edwinstree Hertfordshire
Hazelhanger Edwinstree Hertfordshire
Bowley Eyhorne Kent
Chart [Sutton] Eyhorne Kent
[East] Sutton Eyhorne Kent
Langley Eyhorne Kent
Marley Eyhorne Kent
[Old] Shelve Eyhorne Kent
Otterden Eyhorne Kent
Sutton [Valence] Eyhorne Kent
Oare Faversham Kent
Stalisfield and Stalisfield [Green] Faversham Kent
[St Mary] Cray Helmestrei Kent
[West] Wickham Helmestrei Kent
[Allhallows St Mary and St Werbergh] Hoo Hoo Kent
KirtlingtonOxfordshire
Leybourne Larkfield Kent
Newington, MiltonKent
Radwell Odsey Hertfordshire
Beckley Shamwell Kent
Chalk Shamwell Kent / Essex
Cooling Shamwell Kent
Higham and [Lower] Higham Shamwell Kent
Lampeth St Albans Hertfordshire
Charlton Sutton Northamptonshire
Pimp's [Court] Twyford Kent
Banstead Wallington Surrey
Barton [Ede] Wootton Oxfordshire
Bladon Wootton Oxfordshire
[Nether and Over] Worton Wootton Oxfordshire
Sandford [St Martin] Wootton Oxfordshire
[South] Newington Wootton Oxfordshire
Dernedale,Wye Kent
Fanscombe,Wye Kent

 

Ansgot of Rochester

Lord in 1086:

Farningham, Axton, Kent
Maplescombe, Axton, Kent
Streatham, Brixton, Surrey
Beckenham, Bromley, Kent
Aldington, Eyhorne, Kent
Stockbury, Eyhorne, Kent
Stoke and [Lower and Middle] Stoke, Hoo, Kent
Aylesford, Larkfield, Kent
Howbury, Litlelee, Kent
Eversholt, Manshead, Bedfordshire
Milton [Bryan], Manshead, Bedfordshire
[Great] Delce, Rochester, Kent
Preston [Bissett], Rowley, Buckinghamshire
Henhurst, Shamwell, Kent
Mitcham, Wallington, Surrey

Helto the steward

Lord in 1086:

Dartford, Axton, Kent
Swanscombe, Axton, Kent
Waldridge, Ixhill, Buckinghamshire
Boxley, Maidstone, Kent
Merston, Shamwell, Kent
Dinton, Stone, Buckinghamshire
Hartwell, Stone, Buckinghamshire
Stone, Stone, Buckinghamshire

Bishop Odo of Bayeux
Half brother to William I

Before the Conquest
Lord in 1066:

Dunclent, Cresslow, Worcestershire
Broch, Desborough, Buckinghamshire
Clopton, Pathlow, Warwickshire
Earlscourt, Ramsbury, Wiltshire

After the Conquest
Lord in 1086:

Salisbury, Alderbury, Wiltshire / Somerset
[North] Tidworth, Amesbury, Wiltshire
Crowle, Ash, Worcestershire
Helpringham, Aswardhurn, Lincolnshire
Bourne, Aveland, Lincolnshire
Combpyne, Axmouth, Devon
Swinstead, Beltisloe, Lincolnshire
Carswall, Botloe, Gloucestershire
Irby [-upon-Humber], Bradley, Lincolnshire
Gillingham, Chatham, Kent
Westwick, Chesterton, Cambridgeshire
[West] Clyst, Cliston, Devon
Soar, Diptford, Devon
Carton, Doddingtree, Worcestershire
Swinhope, Haverstoe, Lincolnshire
Waithe, Haverstoe, Lincolnshire
Aston [Sandford], Ixhill, Buckinghamshire
Woodhill, Kingsbridge, Wiltshire
Glevering, Loose, Suffolk
Potsford, Loose, Suffolk
Obthorpe, Ness, Lincolnshire
Wilsthorpe, Ness, Lincolnshire
Evesbatch, Radlow, Herefordshire
[Little] Marcle, Radlow, Herefordshire
Mathon, Radlow, Worcestershire / Herefordshire
Burrington, Roborough, Devon
Chillington, Roborough, Devon
Leuricestone, Roborough, Devon
Manadon, Roborough, Devon
Mutley, Roborough, Devon
Mutley, Roborough, Devon
Weston [Peverell], Roborough, Devon
Whitleigh, Roborough, Devon
Hockley, Rochford, Essex
[Little]thorpe, Rochford, Essex
Thorpe[hall], Rochford, Essex
Cooling, Shamwell, Kent
Haven, Shamwell, Kent
Newton, [South] Greenhoe, Norfolk
Cudworth, South Petherton, Somerset
Tollesbury, Thurstable, Essex
Tolleshunt [d'Arcy, Knights and Major], Thurstable, Essex
Offord [d'Arcy], Toseland, Huntingdonshire
[Saffron] Walden, Uttlesford, Essex
Croxby, Walshcroft, Lincolnshire
Croxby, Walshcroft, Lincolnshire
Holton [-le-Moor], Walshcroft, Lincolnshire
Thoresway, Walshcroft, Lincolnshire
Thorganby, Walshcroft, Lincolnshire
Nazeing, Waltham, Essex
Harpole, Wilford, Suffolk
Abberton, Winstree, Essex
Peldon, Winstree, Essex
Westwood, Wormelow, Herefordshire
Benniworth, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Bullington, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Kingthorpe, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Kingthorpe, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Ludford, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Westlaby, Wraggoe, Lincolnshire
Bodebi, Yarborough, Lincolnshire
Lopingheham, Yarborough, Lincolnshire
[North and South] Killingholme, Yarborough, Lincolnshire
Thornton [Curtis], Yarborough, Lincolnshire
Ulceby, Yarborough, Lincolnshire
Wootton, Yarborough, Lincolnshire

© 2007, P.Green
 

 

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